Photo
msachterphotos:

It never fails to amaze me how hard people work to bring art and beauty to life - 30 years of practice and love to share this dance artform with us for one evening. Magic.

msachterphotos:

It never fails to amaze me how hard people work to bring art and beauty to life - 30 years of practice and love to share this dance artform with us for one evening. Magic.

(via headless-dreamer)

Photo
calvcp:

Every year, almost 1.5 million high school students nationwide experience physical abuse from a boyfriend or girlfriend.

National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month



By Julie Nauman, VCGCB Executive Officer 
It can be hard to relate to statistics; after all, they are just numbers without a face, right? But what happens when that next statistic is your best friend? Your teammate? Your little sister? The closer it hits to home, the easier it is to see that even one victim is too many. Every year, almost 1.5 million high school students nationwide experience physical abuse from a boyfriend or girlfriend.1
That’s one in ten high school students who has been purposefully hit, slapped or physically hurt by a partner.2
Females are disproportionately affected, with one in four high school girls a victim of physical abuse in their relationships.3
When including emotional and verbal injury, the rate of dating abuse jumps to one in three teenagers.4

The prevalence of teen dating violence is inexcusable, but the good news about bad statistics is that YOU can change them. Dating violence is not usually a one-time incident, but a pattern of destructive behaviors used to control another person. In that sense, putting an end to teen dating violence is a matter of spotting healthy versus unhealthy relationships, looking out for your peers, and building a culture of respect where abuse is unacceptable. Only 33% of teens who were in an abusive relationship ever told anyone about the abuse, 5 and 81% of parents believe teen dating violence is not an issue or admit they don’t know if it’s an issue.6 It’s time to change these attitudes in our schools and communities. As a mother, the thought of any child being hurt by, or inflicting pain on another, is infuriating. We—parents, teachers, coaches, mentors—need to speak out against teen dating violence in order to stop the abuse before it begins. We have a shared responsibility to model healthy relationships founded in respect and equality; to teach our children that love and abuse cannot exist simultaneously and that violence doesn’t equal strength. This February, make your voice heard during National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month. 
If you or someone you know has a question about a relationship, visit loveisrespect.org or text “loveis” to 22522. For additional resources, visit http://www.teendvmonth.org. 

calvcp:

Every year, almost 1.5 million high school students nationwide experience physical abuse from a boyfriend or girlfriend.

National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month

By Julie Nauman, VCGCB Executive Officer 
It can be hard to relate to statistics; after all, they are just numbers without a face, right? But what happens when that next statistic is your best friend? Your teammate? Your little sister? The closer it hits to home, the easier it is to see that even one victim is too many. 
  • Every year, almost 1.5 million high school students nationwide experience physical abuse from a boyfriend or girlfriend.1
  • That’s one in ten high school students who has been purposefully hit, slapped or physically hurt by a partner.2
  • Females are disproportionately affected, with one in four high school girls a victim of physical abuse in their relationships.3
  • When including emotional and verbal injury, the rate of dating abuse jumps to one in three teenagers.4
The prevalence of teen dating violence is inexcusable, but the good news about bad statistics is that YOU can change them. Dating violence is not usually a one-time incident, but a pattern of destructive behaviors used to control another person. In that sense, putting an end to teen dating violence is a matter of spotting healthy versus unhealthy relationships, looking out for your peers, and building a culture of respect where abuse is unacceptable. 

Only 33% of teens who were in an abusive relationship ever told anyone about the abuse, 5 and 81% of parents believe teen dating violence is not an issue or admit they don’t know if it’s an issue.6 It’s time to change these attitudes in our schools and communities. As a mother, the thought of any child being hurt by, or inflicting pain on another, is infuriating. We—parents, teachers, coaches, mentors—need to speak out against teen dating violence in order to stop the abuse before it begins. We have a shared responsibility to model healthy relationships founded in respect and equality; to teach our children that love and abuse cannot exist simultaneously and that violence doesn’t equal strength. This February, make your voice heard during National Teen Dating Violence Awareness and Prevention Month. 

If you or someone you know has a question about a relationship, visit loveisrespect.org or text “loveis” to 22522. For additional resources, visit http://www.teendvmonth.org

(via upworthy)

Photoset

Michael Sachter Photography turned 2 today! http://michaelsachter.zenfolio.com  

come take a look… #photo #photography #artist #windows 

(Source: assets)

Quote
"You must understand the whole of life, not just one little part of it. That is why you must read, that is why you must look at the skies, that is why you must sing, and dance, and write poems, and suffer, and understand, for all that is life."

— Jiddu Krishnamurti. (via milk-boxes)

(Source: troubled, via milk-boxes)

Video

#TAXI (#8294) on any mobile gets you to all the fun - Easy come. Easy go. (by freetaxis)

http://poundtaxi.com
Photo
nevver:

Thank God it’s Frida
Text
“I have so much of you in my heart.””

John Keats to Fanny Brawne, 10 July 1819  (via anditslove)

(Source: seabois, via sashastergiou)

Photo
arpeggia:

Mark Rothko - No. 61 (Rust and Blue), 1953 | More

arpeggia:

Mark Rothko - No. 61 (Rust and Blue), 1953 | More

(via pubertad)

Photoset

seananmcguire:

mermaidsandmugshots:

chrisdiaswin:

motionburnsthemood:

Abandoned Amusement Park in New Orleans

I want to do a photoshoot here.

Great shots

(Source: long-live-the-alex-and-the-brave, via )

Photo
aurum-design:

Telecommunications.



Nice work

aurum-design:

Telecommunications.

Nice work

(Source: kenkofoto)

Photo
Great shot

Great shot

(Source: airows, via handa)

Photo
lapresquile:

liquidnight:
© Rita Bernstein / Transient. from the lament series. Hand applied silver emulsion on Japanese gampi paper

lapresquile:

liquidnight:

© Rita Bernstein / Transient. from the lament series. Hand applied silver emulsion on Japanese gampi paper

(via journalofanobody)

Photo
dailyartjournal:

IWATA Sohei
Calligraphy of Japanese idiom 一期一会 ichigo ichie “Live every day as though it were last”

dailyartjournal:

IWATA Sohei

Calligraphy of Japanese idiom 一期一会 ichigo ichie “Live every day as though it were last”

(via journalofanobody)

Photo
gypsji:

18Hand made pinhole plate 30 year old expired film 
By Victor Senkov

gypsji:

18
Hand made pinhole plate 
30 year old expired film 

By Victor Senkov

(via journalofanobody)